First Dinosaur Tail Ever Discovered Is Found Preserved In 99 Million-Year-Old Amber And It’s Covered In Feathers


Paleontologist Lida Xing was collecting samples in Myanmar last year when she made an amazing discovery.


NationalGeographic


She found the first known dinosaur tail preserved in 99 million-year-old amber and — on top of that — it has feathers.


NationalGeographic

The piece of amber, which is about the size and shape of a dried apricot, has a 1.4 inch appendage inside, covered in white and brown feathers.


It’s believed to have belonged to a juvenile coelurosaur, part of a group of theropod dinosaurs.


NationalGeographic


“While individual dinosaur feathers have been found in amber, and evidence for feathered dinosaurs in captured in fossil impressions, this is the first time that scientists are able to clearly associate well-preserved feathers with a dinosaur,” said National Geographic.


NationalGeographic

The amber came from a mine in the Hukawng Valley in Kachin State, Myanmar, and had already been shaped into an oval by a jewelry maker when Lida Xing’s team came across it.


NationalGeographic

The exciting discovery is adding to the evidence that many dinosaurs were covered in feathers, but scientists maintain they could not fly, but might have used to them to keep warm and signal to other dinosaurs.


NationalGeographic

You can read the full report here.

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