Research Chimps Left To Starve On Island Share The Only Food They Have

Etti is one of 200 chimpanzees who were subjected to years of testing at the New York Blood Center (NYBC). No longer needing the animals, NYBC dumped them on a tiny Liberian island to spend the rest of their days, delivering food every other day as there is no natural food source on the island. But then it was announced they would stop doing this — effectively leaving the chimps to die.

Without NYBC’s regular food drop-offs the animals had nothing to eat. To survive, they shared whatever food they could find with young infant chimps.


Jenny Desmond/Humane Society of the United States

The chimps suffered painful medical experiments and heartbreaking mistreatment from the NYBC, according to the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).


Jenny Desmond/Humane Society of the United States

Etti lost an eye after being accidentally shot with a tranquilizer dart and many chimps were missing limbs.

After funding cuts, NYBC claimed it “never had any obligation” to care for the chimpanzees, sparking global outrage.


Jenny Desmond/Humane Society of the United States

Scientists and animal activists wrote open letters and spoke to the media about NYBC’s “shocking” and “disgusting” decision.

HSUS volunteers rushed to the island to help the chimpanzees. They found 66 blind, limping, and sick chimps left without food and fresh water.


Jenny Desmond/Humane Society of the United States

Every day, HSUS members travel to the island with a boatload of food.


Jenny Desmond/Humane Society of the United States

They’re determined that this tiny colony will thrive against all odds — but they stress that they can only do this with continued public donations.

“With your help, we will find a long-term solution to ensure the humane, lifetime care of these chimpanzees,” HSUS writes on the fundraising page.


Jenny Desmond/Humane Society of the United States

To help this abandoned chimpanzee colony, donate or sign the petition for NYBC to take care of the chimps.


Jenny Desmond/Humane Society of the United States