Pennsylvania Supreme Court Rules: Mail-In Ballots To Be Counted 3 Days After Election

Pennsylvania Supreme Court
Pennsylvania Supreme Court

Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court on Thursday ruled in favor of a three-day extension past Election Day to count mail-in ballots.

The Associated Press reported that the court “granted the Democratic Party’s request to order an extension of Pennsylvania’s Election Day-deadline to count mailed-in ballots for three days after Election Day.” 

The PA court, which has a Democratic majority of 5-2 over Republicans, also  “authorized the use of satellite election offices and drop boxes — which Philadelphia and its heavily populated suburbs are planning to use help relieve the pressure from an avalanche of mailed-in ballots expected in the Nov. 3 presidential election.” 

The Daily Wire noted earlier that elected officials within the state are battling over mail-in ballots, in light of the disastrous June primary process: “For its June primary, Pennsylvania implemented no-excuse absentee voting, meaning voters did not need an excuse to request an absentee ballot, for the first time ever. Mail-in ballots skyrocketed to over 1.4 million in the state, overloading the system and delaying the outcomes of several races by weeks.”

Joseph Curl of The Daily Wire explained what would happen if there is no declared winner on Election Day.

“In the Electoral College, the candidate who receives at least 270 of the 538 electoral votes will win the White House. If there’s still no winner, the Constitution kicks in. According to the 12th Amendment, the House of Representatives elects the president and the Senate elects the vice president. That has happened only once, in 1825, when John Quincy Adams won,” Curl explained.

However,  he noted that “it’s not a straight vote by all 435 lawmakers. Instead, each state casts a unified ballot — one state, one vote.”

“Twenty-seven states currently have a majority of Republican representatives, 22 have a majority of Democrats, and one state tied. If a president isn’t selected before Congress reconvenes on Jan. 6, 2021, Republicans in the House would eventually pick their candidate: Donald Trump. But all that could change depending on the outcome of House and Senate elections on Nov. 3,” Curl concluded.